Biography

 

I was born in San Francisco in 1954 and began photographing seriously at the age of twenty while attending College of San Mateo. I received both my BA and MA in Art/Photography from San Francisco State University.  I was hired to head the photography program at College of San Mateo (located a half hour south of San Francisco) in 1984 and retired from that position in 2015. During my 30+ year teaching career I was able to balance the demands of teaching with my art. In 1994, my five-year project: The Presidio—A City Woodland was put on display at the Ansel Adams Center, in San Francisco, by the Friends of Photography.

 

The cultural influences that inspired the Presidio forests led me to England and their historic landscape gardens. In 1998 I was awarded a Fulbright Scholar Award (Britain) where I made photographs capturing the “handmade” quality to their landscape. Between 1999 and 2004 I photographed locations in the United States that connect England to the Presidio—American city parks, golf courses, and rural cemeteries. In 2005 University of Virginia Press published a monograph of my sixteen-year project, titled: Imagining Eden—Connecting Landscapes. The project was included in numerous group exhibits along with solo exhibitions at The University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Triton Museum in Santa Clara, CA, and the Houston Center of Photography.

 

While conducting research for Imagining Eden I became aware of the influence the Italian architect Palladio had on English landscape gardens. I wanted to include the Italian connection to Imagining Eden and in 2002 received a Rockefeller Foundation residency, Bellagio, Italy.

 

During my month-long residency my way of seeing changed. I was able to make photographs that were eventually included in Imagining Eden, but I also realized that another project—a journey—lay ahead. The new work was more abstract and combined architecture and landscape in an unusual way—Measuring Space. That work, over many years, evolved into my current project, Silos.

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Bio

Biography

 

I was born in San Francisco in 1954 and began photographing seriously at the age of twenty while attending College of San Mateo. I received both my BA and MA in Art/Photography from San Francisco State University.  I was hired to head the photography program at College of San Mateo (located a half hour south of San Francisco) in 1984 and retired from that position in 2015. During my 30+ year teaching career I was able to balance the demands of teaching with my art. In 1994, my five-year project: The Presidio—A City Woodland was put on display at the Ansel Adams Center, in San Francisco, by the Friends of Photography.

 

The cultural influences that inspired the Presidio forests led me to England and their historic landscape gardens. In 1998 I was awarded a Fulbright Scholar Award (Britain) where I made photographs capturing the “handmade” quality to their landscape. Between 1999 and 2004 I photographed locations in the United States that connect England to the Presidio—American city parks, golf courses, and rural cemeteries. In 2005 University of Virginia Press published a monograph of my sixteen-year project, titled: Imagining Eden—Connecting Landscapes. The project was included in numerous group exhibits along with solo exhibitions at The University of Michigan Museum of Art, the Triton Museum in Santa Clara, CA, and the Houston Center of Photography.

 

While conducting research for Imagining Eden I became aware of the influence the Italian architect Palladio had on English landscape gardens. I wanted to include the Italian connection to Imagining Eden and in 2002 received a Rockefeller Foundation residency, Bellagio, Italy.

 

During my month-long residency my way of seeing changed. I was able to make photographs that were eventually included in Imagining Eden, but I also realized that another project—a journey—lay ahead. The new work was more abstract and combined architecture and landscape in an unusual way—Measuring Space. That work, over many years, evolved into my current project, Silos.

Sections